Author Claire Gem Interviews Gail Ingis

Author Claire Gem Interviews Gail Ingis

The following is an interview that author Claire Gem did with me. I wanted to share it with you: Today I’m honored to host author/artist/Brooklyn born blonde Gail Ingis to talk about her new release, The Unforgettable Miss Baldwin. Gilded Age Heiresses comes to life delightfully in this, the first installment of a new historical mystery romance series by Gail Ingis. Well researched with vividly portrayed characters, the reader cannot help but get swept into the story from the start. The author’s lush descriptions transport us back in time, the snappy pacing keeps us turning pages, and the story leaves us anxiously awaiting the next Gilded Age Heiress novel.

An interview by Claire Gem

Claire: Gail, what made you decide to set your historical romance in this particular time in our history?

Gail: I wanted my heroine to be feisty, to question the establishment–and in the 19th century it was a rigid one.

Claire: Well, Allie Baldwin certainly fits the role! But it’s not just the women’s vote Allie fights for. What else motivates her?

Gail: It was a time when women immigrants were leaving their homelands for a better life. Instead, they were working in deplorable conditions in factories and their children weren’t schooled. They had to work. Families lived in crowded tenements with so many others in the same situation.

Claire: Who helped inspire Allie’s cause?

Gail: Allie follows in the footsteps of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and so many others fighting for the votes for women, the fight for freedom, and the fight for the right to choose.

Claire: But she runs into the same kind of resistance they did, doesn’t she?

Gail: Most certainly. Allie had to fight her father, her brother, and even turn away from marriage to work for the vote.

Claire: What was one of Allie’s pet peeves?

Gail: She hated the corset. It was symbolic of the stranglehold on women.

Claire: Well your timing couldn’t be better, Gail! 2020 is the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment granting women the right to vote. Bravo!

~~~

A little more about the book:

Opposites attract in this gilded age historical romance when a young American suffragette eschews marriage until a handsome detective is hired to protect her from a dangerous stalker.

It’s not that she doesn’t want to marry…
Allie Baldwin is tired of writing about the latest fashions for the society column of her father’s newspaper, the New York Sentinel. Determined to write about important issues, Allie can’t help but defy danger at every turn. When she narrowly escapes a riot at a suffrage rally, Allie’s beleaguered parents enlist the services of a security agent—a dashing and debonair detective, with a knack for getting under Allie’s skin.

He’s not ready for marriage…
Peter Harrison is too busy running Harrison Detective Agency to bother with courtships and conjugality. He refuses to make the same mistakes his father made—marrying too young and forsaking family for work. But when a newspaper magnate hires him to protect his willful daughter—Peter is torn between his oath to bachelorhood and an alluring attraction to the ravishing redhead with a nose for trouble.

When a mysterious fire sparks her investigative instincts, can Allie stick to reporting the facts and restrain her flowering feelings for the handsome detective?

~~~Spunky Allie Baldwin wants to write about more significant issues in her father’s newspaper than the current fashion trends. Bottom line is, Allie is a suffragette who is far from shy and, defying her father, plunges headfirst into the fray of suffragette rallies. Worried for her safety, her parents hire a security guard to try to keep her out of trouble.

You can get your copy of The Unforgettable Miss Baldwin here, and find out more about Gail Ingis at her website.

Interviewer, Claire Gem is a multi-published, award-winning author of emotional romance—contemporary, paranormal, romantic suspense, and women’s fiction. She writes about strong, resilient women who won’t give up their quest for a happy-ever-after—and the men lucky enough to earn their love. No helpless, hapless heroines here. These spunky ladies redefine romance, on their terms.

Hearts Unloched
Hearts Unloched
Claire Gem

Phantom Traces
Phantom Traces
Claire Gem

from: $18.49

A Taming Season
A Taming Season
Claire Gem

Electricity: A Haunted Voices Novel

Claire has a special of short stories up for preorder on Amazon: ENIGMATA: Eerie Bits, Book 1 – A Collection of Short Stories by Claire Gem. Leaves you wondering where, why and what. It certainly ignited my curiosity, and gave me goosebumps, the kind that chilled me deep in my imagination. Want a thrill? Order now, and they’ll be ready to read on 9/29.

In the 19th Century… Women’s Suffrage

In the 19th Century… Women’s Suffrage

It began around 1840 here in the USA. Women’s suffrage. That’s the same year of Ireland’s potato famine. Women had their own famine, lack of freedom, poor job situations, lack of education for children who had to work to help their families. Working conditions shamefully were like rat holes. Women have been fighting for their freedom for almost two centuries, the vote finally came in 1920, but the fight continues.

I’m still writing my book, the Unforgettable Miss Baldwin. Allie, bless her heart, has a passion to see women get the vote, and have rights, be free. She’s working with Susan B. Anthony and the many women fighting for the same. Of course no resolution happened in her day, but she fought alongside the many women working to change the way women were treated. The resolutions below are actually from Wikipedia’s 20th century list.

Dragged off to jail for participating in a freedom fight.

Those who fought got dragged off to jail. Some went on hunger strikes and were forced fed. Unbelievable. This is not a history lesson, but some of the stories read like unsolved mysteries.

If you remember Gloria Steinham, another fighter for women’s freedom, along with Billy Jean King and others, we are still fighting.

Resolutions 1325 and 1820 and CEDAW share the following agenda on women’s human rights and gender equality:

  1. Demand women’s participation in decision-making at all levels
  2. Rejection of violence against women as it impedes the advancement of women and maintains their subordinate status
  3. Equality of women and men under the law; protection of women and girls through the rule of law
  4. Demand security forces and systems to protect women and girls from gender-based violence
  5. Recognition of the fact that distinct experiences and burdens of women and girls come from systemic discrimination
  6. Ensure that women’s experiences, needs and perspectives are incorporated into the political, legal and social decisions that determine the achievement of just and lasting peace.https://bit.ly/2Ejoq3n

eBook, print book, audio

BEAUTY IN A BOTTLE

BEAUTY IN A BOTTLE

Gail Ingis (I’m using Beautycounter products)

Beauty in a bottle has been around 6000 years. From the copper and lead ore that the ancient Egyptians used to create the world’s first cosmetics to the scientifically advanced products of today that can do everything from hide pores, smooth complexions, and turn the pale green of your eyes a vivid shade of emerald, makeup has been an integral part of humankind for thousands of years. Over the centuries, women used burnt matches to darken their eyes, berries to stain their lips and young boys’ urine to fade their freckles. They even swallowed ox blood in some misguided attempt to improve their complexions.

Women throughout history put their health at risk with many of their homemade cosmetics. In some cultures, for example, women used arsenic, lead, mercury, and even leeches to give themselves the pale appearance deemed beautiful in the old days. Thankfully, we’ve come a long way from the days of using toxic and deadly mixtures to enhance our looks. Or have we?

According to the Scientific American Magazine, the government knows just about as much as you do about what you’re putting on your skin—that is to say, not much. My recent encounter with Beautycounter has answered the many questions I have had about women’s health and allergies that have become prevalent over the last thirty or forty years. Has women’s health been affected by what they use for their face and bodies? BeautyCounter’s Gregg Renfrew has answers:

Gregg Renfrew, Founder of Beautycounter

Like many of you, I’m a wife and mom—and, like many of you, I didn’t know what I didn’t know. As I applied sunscreen, lotion, and any number of beauty products on myself and my kids, I never thought for a second they might not be safe: After all, I thought, we live in a country that regulates everything. So imagine my surprise when I learned that when it comes to the personal care industry, that’s simply not the case. Companies are allowed to use harmful ingredients and make their own judgments about safety. And so I started Beautycounter, a company devoted to progress. Here you’ll find a wealth of empowering information about ways we can all make the world healthier, along with safer products you can trust. Because we all deserve better. Our vision is bold; real answers are never timid. Help us put truth back in beauty.

Our Mission To get safer products into the hands of everyone. Decades of studies indicate that serious health issues (including but not limited to asthma, cancer, and infertility) are on the rise and are due in some part to our ongoing exposure to toxic chemicals—whether it’s in the shower, on our commute, while we eat lunch at a local restaurant, or when we clean our kitchens at home.
There are more than 80,000 chemicals on the market today. Many don’t have any safety data. This is particularly true of those used in the skin care and beauty industry. What’s worse is that the Food and Drug Administration (the agency that regulates cosmetics in the United States) allows companies to use chemicals known to be extremely harmful in the products we put on our bodies and on our kids’ bodies every single day, day after day, and to make their own judgments about safety. It’s time for a change.
The United States has not passed a major federal law to regulate the safety of ingredients used in personal care products since 1938. Over the past two decades, the European Union has banned more than 1,300 chemicals in the product formulas of personal care products and restricted the levels of over 250 more in such products. The United States has only partially banned 30 to date.
We deserve better, and we’re doing something about it. At Beautycounter, we’re committed to a health and safety standard that goes well beyond what’s required by U.S. law: We’ve banned the use of more than 1,500 questionable or harmful chemicals through our “Never List”— all while ensuring our products perform and that they’re as indulgent as any other shampoo, lipstick, or oil in the market. It’s not easy work, but it’s well worth it. This is about progress—not perfection. Because every little bit counts.

Learn more about the impact the environment is having on your health.

www.beautycounter.com/ourstory

The prestigious and reliable Scientific American Magazine speaks: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-safe-are-cosmetics/

Finding Beautycounter has been fantastic for me. I asked a friend what she was doing these days, she told me she found this company that was doing amazing work like developing safe products for face and body. According to the FDA, an average U.S. consumer uses about 10 cosmetic products in a day, including makeup, soap, shampoo, lotion, hair gel and cologne. Join me in treating your body well with Beautycounter products. I love their makeups and creams and feel safe using them.

Check out www.beautycounter.com  to see what’s available.

Let me know if you want to sample any: http://beautycounter.com/gailingis. According to the FDA, a cosmetic is anything used for “cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness or altering the appearance.

June is Audiobook Month! Try out Whispersync with INDIGO SKY. Audible: … Amazon:

STAYIN’ ALIVE!

STAYIN’ ALIVE!

Indigo Sky by Gail Ingis

Bookcover

Bookcover

If you like romance, and you like rip-roaring adventure, Indigo Sky is for you! Shopping at Tiffany’s, getting caught up in the New York Draft Riot, the Civil War, and the wilds of the Great Plains. Here’s an excerpt from my book that will curl your toes.

Excerpt: Dawn finally broke, and Leila sat listlessly on the pallet. Would today be the day she was raped? Death was preferable.

Little Star peeked through the doorway and crooked her finger. “Come.”

Leila crawled out and blinked against the strong light. Rising stiffly, she stretched, enjoying the sun on her face. She smiled at children laughing and playing between the tipis.

A group of women waited for her. “You bathe.”

Bathe? Leila almost laughed with relief.

The women led her silently to a copse of trees. A stream gurgled over rocks. They stripped her clothes off, urged her into a deep pool and washed her with a chunk of herb scented soap.

She reveled in the cold water until an elder hustled her out, drying her with scraps of soft hide.

Stony faced, the elder worried her gums and mumbled something rubbing herb oils on Leila’s body. Deep crevices on her face sagged in a perpetual expression of discontent. The elder peered over Leila, her small black eyes glittered with malice. She rattled off in an angry tirade.

One of the young women giggled behind slim fingers.

Leila glanced from one to the other. “What did she say?”

Little Star arrived with a hide garment over her arm and handed it to the elder. “She say you white like chicken fat, and don’t know why Red Arrow want you.”

The truth dawned on Leila. This was the moment she’d dreaded. She backed away holding up her palms. “N—no!”

Snarling, the elder grabbed Leila and issued brief instructions. The other women hastily pulled the buckskin dress over her head. Beads and feathers decorated the soft garment. Had circumstances been different, the dress would have delighted Leila. The women took her arms and led her back to the lodge.

Red Arrow stood in the center of a clearing between the tipis, hands behind his back, black eyes impassive.

Leila’s heart pounded and she hung back. The women shoved her and she fell to her knees at the warrior’s feet. “I—I will not be your woman—your whore.” She took his callused hand. “Please, I have a husband.”

He shook her off. “You obey.”

“I can’t—won’t!”

Red Arrow looked at Hook Nose. The leader nodded at a group of warriors. They stepped forward and hauled Leila up, dragging her from the clearing.

She twisted around. “What are they going to do to me?” She cried.

For you viewing pleasure, here’s the Indigo Sky trailer: Indigo Sky_07_11_15 – Small

Back cover blurb: In a whirlwind romance, a lovely New York socialite marries a fêted, debonair author. But beneath the charm is a cheating husband addicted to hasheesh. Her dream marriage turns sour and the simplicity of her life runs amok when a handsome stranger, her husband’s business partner, threatens her staunch loyalty to her wayward husband. When she faces the ugly truth about her marriage, her need to finalize her divorce sends her on mad chase across the wilds of nineteenth century America with a handsome stranger—she learns hard lessons of murder, kidnapping and more that almost destroy her.

Print book, eBook, Audiobook

Print book, eBook, Audiobook

Stay tuned for more . . . Amazon eBOOK, Indigo Sky, is available now . . . find the new release in PAPERBACK up on Amazon. The AUDIOBOOK – available soon.

Follow Gail:

Amazon Author Page

Amazon Buy Link

Artist Page

Facebook

Goodreads

Trailer

Twitter

Website

 

 

ELECTROLYSIS

ELECTROLYSIS

Beauty Therapist

Beauty Therapist

It’s good for women and good for men too. Be happy with beautiful hair-free skin, the skin you’ve always dreamed of. I so believe this is the way to rid yourself of unwanted face and body hair, I decided to write about it today. It’s all about electrolysis, permanent hair removal. With electrolysis, little-by-little the hair follicles disappear. I have been visiting an electrologist for as long as hair appeared on my face, hair that would be better on my hubby’s face, not mine. My visits after treatment dwindled in frequency, now I go only yearly, or if I see one hair, I do not tweeze, I usually visit my electrologist.

Rita Hayworth before-after-hairline-electrolysis

Rita Hayworth before-after-hairline-electrolysis

I know there are other methods of hair removal, but I know that none, I mean none, are permanent. Only electrolysis is permanent. Recently, after being with my electrologist for the last fifteen years, she, Fatima, decided to go back to school. I had to find someone new. Today’s recommendation came from my hair salon, Karen Kolenda, State Licensed Electrologist, who’s office is at the Brick Walk in Fairfield, CT. Karen has good hands. We talked before the treatment when she asked if I ever had electrolysis, and yes, I had. I knew what to expect, and was pleased that it was exactly as I expected. Her office is clean and, although small, is well layed out and comfortable.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
electrolysis slide_7Charles Michel was an American ophthalmologist best known for publishing the first clinical report of successful electrology in 1875. Michel was practicing in St. Louis, Missouri, when he began using a battery-powered needle epilator to treat trichiasis (ingrown eyelashes) in 1869. This direct current–powered method was called electrolysis because a chemical reaction in the hair follicle causes sodium hydroxide to form, which damages the follicle. Electrolysis is also sometimes called galvanic electrolysis.
 Do not fear the use of the fine probe that gives off a small amount of electrical current to destroy the hair root permanently without puncturing or harming the skin. The current is adjustable for your comfort, and feels like a pin prick. Some areas are more sensitive than others, but as I mentioned, the current is adjustable and can be lessened.
One of my friends, a young woman, began shaving her facial hair, and now, she has to shave everyday. All methods, except electrolysis, causes the hair to thicken and grow deeper. Facial hair does seem to begin to be prevalent when a woman’s hormones begin to change, usually in the late forties or early fifties.
For more answers to your questions, you can call Karen or visit her. It is not expensive to do this. I usually only need 15 minutes, that cost me today $28 cash or check. So worth every penny. Less than a manicure.
Karen Kolenda Gregory, Suite !-5 Downstairs at the Brick Walk, 1275 Post Road, Fairfield, CT 06824, 203-254-2480.
NEWSY NEWS about “INDIGO SKY”

NEWSY NEWS about “INDIGO SKY”

Indigo Sky book cover

Indigo Sky book cover

Okay, okay, so this is a pitch for my new book . . . but it’s not out there yet . . . First let me tell you what’s going on—my editor from Soul Mate Publishing released my final draft to the publisher Monday, September 14. That probably means we’ll stay on schedule for the release, Wednesday, October 21, 2015. If you don’t know what writing is about, let me tell you that it’s about rewriting and rewriting again and again. Yup, the whole manuscript got rewritten numerous times to hopefully, a sweet, sensuous and spirited read. This week, my blog was going to be about women’s adventures in the Civil War, instead, I’ll give you a little excerpt of my heroine, Leila, when she bumps into her long lost school friend Cornelia.

INDIGO SKY excerpt:

Certainly her mother had made it clear that Leila committed a serious breach of etiquette by joining her husband on a bachelor spree, and people could talk about her unladylike conduct.

I don’t care what my mother or anybody else says. Leila pouted. Anyway, what’s one more scandal? Rumors surrounding Hank’s excesses and philandering had plagued her marriage from the outset.

She poured more tea and took a sip of the hot brew, casting a glance at Hank. Millburn’s shoulders were twice the width of her husband’s, and he was a head taller than Hank. They seemed well ensconced at the bar. She sighed and contemplated returning to her compartment.

“Leila?”

She looked up. A tall woman with blond curls pinned high on her head stood beside the booth. A smile touched the woman’s alabaster face. “Leila Dempsey? Is that really you?”

“Cornelia?” Leila gaped at her friend. She and Cornelia Hancock had attended boarding school together for eight years.

“I haven’t seen you in ages,” she bubbled, taking Leila’s arm. “Oh, do give me a hug.”

Leila rose and was enveloped in perfumed arms. “How wonderful to see you.”

“It’s good to see you, too, my friend.” Cornelia dropped into the opposite seat, smiling broadly. “Where are you going? What are you doing in Albany? Last I heard you were in Florida.”

“Yes, well, we’re back in New York, and now we’re on our way west for business with my husband and his partner,” Leila said, eyeing her warily. Cornelia was part of the social circle and would have heard the latest news. Leila suspected she still corresponded with everyone from their class.

“I’m stopping in New York City to meet a Doctor Brown, who works with orphans, then I’m going on to St. Louis to pursue a nursing career.”

“Cornelia, how wonderful!” Leila was happy to have companionship, and her melancholy dissipated with the news from her friend.

***

Read more in my book, INDIGO SKY, to be released on October 21, 2015.

At the time of the civil war, Florence Nightingale inspired women to take control of their lives. Society was against women doing anything outside the home. They were thought to be unintelligent and dependent. My own grandmother, Rose, in the early 20th century, in Russia, was a mathematics teacher. Way before her time. But she and her family were driven out of Russia, and came to America in 1922. That’s a story for another time. Women are competent, multi-faceted and are infinitely capable. Leila, my heroine, is an amazing woman. She married a successful syndicated writer, and believed she had dream marriage. But the marriage turned into a trap of addiction, lies and women. She puts up with him beyond acceptable. Follow her struggle in my INDIGO SKY, coming soon, October 2015.

Do you like to read, and what? Romance, suspense, thrillers, paranormal, fantasy, young adult, women’s fiction, inspirational?

The ebook will be available on Amazon.

Watch for the trailer . . .

EXPERIENCE ESPARDRILLES

EXPERIENCE ESPARDRILLES

Leopard & black

Leopard & black

Espadrilles have been made in Pyrennean Catalonia (Spain) and the Occitania region since the 14th century at least, and there are shops in the Basque country (Spain) still in existence that have been making espadrilles for over a century. The oldest, most primitive form of espadrilles goes as far back as 4000 years. Traditional espadrilles have an canvas upper with the toe and vamp cut in one piece and seamed to the rope sole at the sides. Often they have laces at the throat that are wrapped around the ankle to hold the shoes securely in place. Traditional espadrilles are worn by all.

La Ramblas, street in Barcelona

La Ramblas, street in Barcelona

A must when in Spain, is to visit an espadrille workshop. La Manual Alpargatera, the workshop we shopped, started their business just after the Spanish Civil War in the 1940s. The shop is near the Ramblas, the most popular street in Barcelona. La Manual is a must visit for the informed traveler and a yearly appointment for the folks of Barcelona. Tom and I enjoyed selecting the sole, the tops, the colors.

Like picking candy, which one?

Like picking candy, which one?

Yes! We did, we went shopping in Spain. The espadrille is an ecological light shoe made with natural materials like hemp and jute. The soles can be rubber. Those are for street walking. Jute soles are more delicate, but they are so soft, it’s tempting to wear them for everything. You can get sneakers, or high wedgies. Men wear them as well as women and children. images-7 images-9

Tom bought a couple of pair, I bought several, in different colors, for me and for gifts. The owner of the store worked with us. He told us to buy them one size smaller because they stretch. It’s difficult to get them on, but once you do, they fit fine, and they do stretch.

In those 4000 years, the tradition has survived, with variations, you can imagine, but the basics have not changed. The shoe offers comfortable footwear that fit any feet. images-10 images

Care is easy. Wear on dry ground. If they get wet, the hemp/jute (vegetable fibers) soak up the water. The drenched sole will deform due to weight of the wearer’s body. But they can be redeemed. Wash them with soap and water right away. If hand sewn, wash by hand in cold water, rinse well and dry. This prevents rot. For the washing machine, use a short program and cold water. White or cream colored espadrilles sometimes yellow if the canvas dries before the sole. If that happens, when dry, clean the canvas with bleach mixed in water to whiten.

Here’s where – Carrer d’Avinyo, 7 – 08002 Barcelona, Spain
Tel. +34 933 010 172 – amanualalpargatera.coml

Are you espardrille owners? What do you like about them?

 

FORM FOLLOWS FEMININE

FORM FOLLOWS FEMININE

Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who designed some of the 20th Century’s most famous modernist buildings, died December 5, 2012, ten days before his 105th birthday. Oscar n archway into skyA memorial service was held in the presidential palace in Brasilia. Niemeyer’s family was informed of the honor in a phone call from President Dilma Rousseff. “Brazil has lost one of its geniuses.” Rio de Janeiro’s Mayor Eduardo Paes declared three days of mourning in Niemeyer’s home city.

A student of Le Corbusier, Niemeyer developed a distinctive style defined by stark concrete and sweeping curves. He rose to international fame as the architect of the main government buildings in the Brazilian capital, Brasilia, inaugurated in 1960. His bold futuristic designs in Brasilia made the new capital a dramatic statement of confidence in the future of Brazil, and an icon of modern architecture. He also worked with Swiss-born modernist architect Le Corbusier on the UN building in New York. He continued to work on new projects until earlier 2012.

curvy

Niemeyer said his stylized swoops were inspired by Brazilian women’s curves.

“Form follows function” has been the credo of designers and architects since the 19th century. The dictum was coined by the American architect Louis Sullivan in his article “The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered” that was published in 1896.

The last hundred years of architecture are often described–in grossly simplified language–by a tug-of-war between ornament and functionalism. Niemeyer never saw things in those terms. He was 20 years younger than Le Corbusier and looked up to him. Like Corbu, Niemeyer saw his expressive buildings as “pure forms,” driven by his own brand of rationalism. “When you have a large space to conquer, the curve is the natural solution,” he said. “I once wrote a poem about the curve. The curve I find in the mountains of my country, in the sinuousness of its rivers, in the waves of the ocean and on the body of the beloved woman.” “My work is not about ‘form follows function,'” he famously said, “but ‘form follows beauty’ or, even better, ‘form follows feminine.'”

In 1988, he was awarded the prestigious Pritzker Prize. British architect Lord Norman Foster was inspired by Niemeyer, then a 104 year-old who was still youthful in his energy and creativity. “He told me that architecture is important, but that life is more important. And yet in the end his architecture is his ultimate legacy. Like the man himself, it is eternally youthful – he leaves us with a source of delight and inspiration for many generations to come.”

Oscar Niemeyer portrait by Eduardo Kobra

Oscar Niemeyer portrait by Eduardo Kobra

However, Niemeyer’s style was not to everyone’s taste, and for a communist some people say his work was not very people-friendly – focusing more on the architecture’s form than on its inhabitants or functionality. He went on to create more than 600 buildings around the world. His legacy endures in museums, monuments, schools and churches in Brazil and beyond. Many of the designs were initially sketched on a table overlooking his beloved Rio de Janeiro and its famous Copacabana beach, replete with the women, waves and hills from which he drew such inspiration.

Renzo Piano, fellow architect said, “Architecture is a profession where you need a long period of apprenticeship. You never stop learning, this is something that Niemeyer kept saying. And I think he learned until the end, he was that kind of person. As an architect you have to be a sociologist, builder, scientist, poet. It was about integrity. In some ways he was more of a moral example, an example of life. He was concerned about political life, and architecture is political in some ways. In the sense of doing things that belonged to the civic life of people in the city. Architecture is the art of making cities not just making buildings. He was a good example of how architecture can be a noble, civilized job.”

Brazilian street artist Eduardo Kobra has graced the entire side of a skyscraper on the bustling street of Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo with a 52 meter tall polychromatic portrait of Oscar Niemeyer. Kobra began work on the mural on the 14th of January, 2013 and since then has solicited the help of four other artists from his team to complete the colossal artwork. Oscar Niemeyer 1 EduardoKobra1

Which is your favorite? Clean curvy contemporary forms or the classics with ornamentation?

 

 

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

Mr. Wright strolling the campus with his cane but without his cape. Frank Lloyd Wright spent the last two decades of his life overseeing the largest single-site collection of his designs.

I remembered my architectural studies of Frank Lloyd Wright, (FLW) and his unusual life, when I read colleague and author PJ Sharon’s post about the windy city, Chicago. The windy city, changed by the impact of FLW, and where Paula attended Romantic Times Booklovers convention, has a collection of FLW designs, the likes of which are unsurpassed.  (Look for Paula’s convention link at the end If you want to read about her experience.)

Paula’s post reminded me of FLW and his dedication to architecture. FLW,  King of architecture, influenced the architectural community with his daring, his technology, his attitude. There was an irresistible charm about him. Women adored him, men admired him, architects envied him. He spoke to women’s groups telling them how to live, how to decorate, how to get out of the rut of loving dead things, things with no form. He managed to open up a new way for these women to see form. What is form? In order for form to resonate, make you feel good, it needs to have soul. Houses of the times were rigid boxes with no soul, until FLW opened them up. Victoriana had no soul, just lots and lots and lots of collections. His openness was a fresh new way to live. In his gentle way of talking to the women who listened with a passion, he said “Ornament is not about prettying the outside of something, but rather it should have balance, proportion, harmony.” All of which creates  what FLW called the natural house. A house that blends with the land, a house that is designed with views to let the outside in.

Built in 1934 for Malcolm and Nancy WIlley, this Minneapolis home was restored in 2007 using cypress, plaster and regional brick.
Photo by Terrence Moore
It was abandoned for seven years, and totally disheveled, but here it is restored to its natural house form.
FLW never earned a degree. He left engineering school to apprentice in Chicago in the office of Adler and Sullivan. He learned on the job, then his opened his own practice. His belief in the natural, organic architecture, evolved from his exposure to Japanese architecture, his belief in simplicity, the nature of materials and influence of England’s Arts and Crafts Movement. He integrated these ideas of his time as he would the parts of a house, composing a symphonic whole that transcended the parts.
FLW not only did lots of buildings, but also did many wives. Frank at 69 with one of his many wives.

FLW home and studio with great gift shop

Here’s a FLW gift shop link: http://www.shopwright.org/

 

 

Do you have a FLW house or wish you had one?

Paula’s convention link:    http://secretsof7scribes.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/rt-recap.

“Inspiration is fifty percent dedication and fifty percent discipline. Together they equal progress.”

TITANIC FAMOUS FABLES

TITANIC FAMOUS FABLES

Did you have a relative that was on the Titanic? Who do you know that was booked on the Titanic? A great, great aunt, uncle, grandparent? This is the Titanic famous fables year of remembrance.

Spirit of the Blythe Titanic 24x30 Oil by Gail Ingis Claus

In its innocence, the Titanic was cruising along not realizing it was about to change the lives of twenty-two hundred people.  It is one hundred years since the maiden voyage of the Titanic. What is magical about its one hundred years? The14th of April is the date, one hundred years ago, that it sunk. It sunk taking 1523 men, women and children and crew and everyone’s worldly goods with it. No one noticed the iceberg, no one heeded warnings from other ships, no one believed the Titanic could sink.

Only ten percent of an iceberg is above water. If you see six feet, then there is sixty more feet of iceberg beneath the water.

Iceberg above and below

By the time the captain of the Titanic discovered the iceberg, the ship was along side it as it ripped a gash in its hull. The ship’s engineers claimed the Titanic was unsinkable.  If a disaster  happened, it would be its own lifeboat. It was compartmentalized to contain any water so that most of the ship would be safe from filling with the sea water.

Some, 705 passengers, did escape the watery death, most of them women and children, who watched in horror from their lifeboats, as their husbands and fathers went down with the ship or languished in the Atlantic’s frigid waters until the freezing cold pulled the life from them or they got sucked down with the ship. Distress calls reached the Carpathia. But they were  four hours away. When they finally reached the  site, it was too late.

According to history, the sinking of this ship robbed the lives of folks who were lower on the pay scale than the wealthy, like those in steerage, restaurant workers, folks who were coming to the USA to find a better life. Since sinking ships know no class, the rich went down with the poor.

It is strange and newsworthy, the wealthy paid hefty sums for their cabins, according to the History Channel’s report on April 10th, sums of $90,000 for a cabin were not unusual.

Would you come to our Titanic Collaboration show?

We would love to have you. Come to Lockwood Mathews Mansion Museum on Thursday, April 26, 5-7 P.M. The Titanic Collaboration Art Show will be opening for your viewing pleasure. Free. Please RSVP 203-838-9799 extension 4.

 

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