DESIGNER FABRICS YOU CAN’T BUY-UNTIL . . .

DESIGNER FABRICS YOU CAN’T BUY-UNTIL . . .

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House is considered one of the foremost style-setters in the decorative fabric industry and is the first choice of many of the world’s top interior designers. Many of their fabrics retail for well over $400 dollars per yard.

Headquartered in New York City’s famed D&D Building, Clarence House has been at the forefront of the decorative fabric industry for over 40 years. They were founded in 1961 by New York designer Robin Roberts, who envisioned a company that would fill a void in the decorative fabric industry, a void that was created by the vast majority fabric companies refusing to take the necessary design risks to move the home decor business forward. Since the very beginning, Roberts has filled Clarence House’s line of decorative fabrics with imported fabrics never before seen in America. It wasn’t long after that that Clarence House decided to get involved in all aspects of the creative process by starting their own in-house design studio and making the now famous Kazumi Yoshida their head art director. To this day Kazumi still controls the evolution of each design from its conception to the finished product.

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House Fabric

Not long after becoming involved in the decorative fabric industry they were quickly becoming world renowned for their extremely unusual and opulent designs. Although they are most famous for their hand screen-printing of fabrics and wallpapers, Clarence House also offers the highest quality velvets, brocades, damasks, silks, cottons, linens, sheers, trimmings and leathers. Throughout their years in the decorative fabric business they have supplied the fabrics for some of the world’s most famous museums, residences, and historic sites. Their name appears in every issue of any important interior design magazine available– including Architectural Digest, Florida Design, and Veranda.

Ideas for left over fabric

Ideas for left over fabric

With 16 showrooms throughout the United States and additional showrooms in South Africa, Canada, and Australia—Clarence House is on a well-earned course to achieve world-wide design dominance.

Unfortunately, unless you are an Architect or an Interior Designer you cannot buy directly from them.

That is, of course, only true if you don’t know the Design Diva. Having known the people at Clarence House for over 15 years she is able to purchase large amounts of exclusive decorative fabrics from them and bring them to you at extremely discounted prices.

Now isn’t that Divalicious?

Close up for use of leftover fabric-fun

Close up for use of leftover fabric-fun

Designer Fabrics Below Wholesale

The people who run Design Diva Fabrics have been involved in many of the design communities most prestigious organizations for over 30 years. OUR LOVE of interior fabrics fuels us in our worldwide search for the most unusual fabrics and trims available. From the luscious Velvets of Belgium and the magnificent Brocades of Italy to the intricately Hand Embroidered Silks of the Far East, we have it all. And as if that was’nt enough, almost all of our fabrics are normally available exclusively to designers and architects.

Now you would think that the fact that we are able to acquire these fabrics at all would be impressive enough to be our claim to fame, but it’s not. Not only do we get our customers fabrics that are normally not available to them; we get our customers these fabrics for a fraction of the price that a licensed Interior Designer would pay for them.

Have you ever shopped at the D&D Building 979 Third Avenue, NYC?

 

CURLS AND FURLS OF THE 19TH CENTURY

CURLS AND FURLS OF THE 19TH CENTURY

Sagrada Familia Church, Barcelona, Spain

Antonio Gaudi died under the wheels of a tram and was to be buried in an unknown grave. Yet, he is known for his Barcelona Gaudi Architecture – Sagrada Familia, Park Guell, Casa Milà, Casa Batlló in Barcelona. He was an enthusiast of the nineteenth century popular style of Art Nouveau, a style celebrating art for art’s sake. A style that did not relate to any designs of the past. The style was an invention of a new kind of ornament based on the asymmetrical flowing lines of plant forms.  Gaudi impressed the architectural community with his wild, vehement and whimsical forms of the curls  and furls of the style. The stone and iron used in his work were bent and warped creating surfaces of great complexity that flow like molten lava. He used outlandish, original, colored mosaics and toyed with ideas in architecture, both interior and exterior, that bring visitors and tourists to Barcelona by the millions.

Unless you have been there, you cannot possibly imagine the overwhelming pomposity, grandeur, and fantasy of this church. I have traveled the world over, from the USA to England,  Portugal,  Mexico,  Spain,  Bangladesh,  Africa, and to other countries. I have seen churches, I have studied churches, I have painted churches . . .  and to clarify before you have a chance to verify, the churches I painted were on canvas. Never have I seen, explored, or experienced any like Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia. His work has been described as “melted butter.” The towers here, in the above image, with the rippling contours of the stone facade make it look as though Sagrada Familia is melting in the sun.

Façade

The holy figures of stone imbedded into the fascia are unbelievable. From afar, the details blur some. This image shows the details. The church began its life in 1882. From 1883 Gaudi worked on the architecture until his death. He left a legacy of information. The church, in the lower level, has models, architectural drawings, and yards and yards and yards of information to continue building to completion. And so it goes. There are always cranes on site. Always workers on site, always lines of onlookers on site. The church is open to the public everyday all year except for Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Death

Gaudí’s funeral (12 June 1926)

On 7 June 1926, Gaudí was taking his daily walk to the Sant Felip Neri church for his habitual prayer and confession. While walking along the Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes between Girona and Bailén streets, he was struck by a passing tram and lost consciousness.[48] Assumed to be a beggar because of his lack of identity documents and shabby clothing, the unconscious Gaudí did not receive immediate aid. Eventually a police officer transported him in a taxi to the Santa Creu Hospital, where he received rudimentary care.[49] By the time that the chaplain of the Sagrada Família, Mosén Gil Parés, recognised him on the following day, Gaudí’s condition had deteriorated too severely to benefit from additional treatment. Gaudí died on 10 June 1926 at the age of 73 and was buried two days later. A large crowd gathered to bid farewell to him in the chapel of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in the crypt of the Sagrada Família.

Mosaics section

Gaudi is dead, long live Gaudi.

Roof architecture at Casa Batllo

The towers of Sagrada Familia can be seen from almost everywhere in Barcelona.  Buildings . . .architecture, set the tone, the culture, for a town, a city, a country.  Architecture is a live, breathing, functioning sculpture.  You cannot hold it in your hand, but you can become part of it. You can love it, hate it, tolerate it, but like it or not, architecture sets the pace by which you live and survive.

Are you familiar with the architecture surrounding you? Are you aware that architecture is public art?

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