PHOENIX, AZ and WRIGLEY GUM

PHOENIX, AZ and WRIGLEY GUM

Wrigley Estate In Phoenix, Arizona. In Arizona, it’s all about the mountains.

Wrigley was famous for giving us the tantalizing chewing gum. He gave us culture and influenced the character of Phoenix, Arizona with his presence and architecture.

Wriggley rooftops. Arizona rooftops look like Portugal rooftops.

The Wrigley Mansion was built by chewing gum magnate, William Wrigley, Jr., as a 50th wedding anniversary gift for his wife Ada. They named it “La Colina Solana,” meaning the sunny hill. After enjoying his new home only a few times, Wrigley fell ill and died there.

The custom, in the late 19th and early 20th century, for the big money men, were to build small country homes, this one 16,850 square feet. Check out the number of rooms.

The Wrigley’s winter cottage was the smallest Wrigley house, covering 16,850 square feet, with 24 rooms and 17 bathrooms.

After Wrigley’s death, the house passed through several owners, serving for a time as extra space for the Arizona Biltmore and then as an exclusive, private club. Eventually, local millionaire George Hormel bought the house. An egalitarian sort, Hormel wanted everyone to be able to enjoy it. The Wrigley Mansion is required to operate as a private club because of zoning restrictions, but to allow everyone to enjoy it, he set the annual dues at only ten dollars, which are donated to local charities. The dues can be paid in advance or at the door.

The Wrigley Mansion is located on a hill just above the Arizona Biltmore, and they offer tours twice a day. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance for all tours.

Today, the Wrigley Mansion is used mostly for events and weddings, but they also serve dinner on weekends and Sunday brunch, and the bar is open on Friday and Saturday evenings. We recommend getting there shortly before sunset and snagging a table on the balcony for some of the best views in the city.

Other Wrigley Houses

Wrigley also owned houses in other places. His primary residence in Chicago is used mostly for filming these days and his Pasadena house (bought so his wife Ada could watch the Rose Parade in comfort) is now the headquarters of the Tournament of Roses. His Catalina Island house operates as a high-end bed and breakfast called the Inn on Mt. Ada. His fourth home was in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

Getting to the Wrigley Mansion

Wrigley Mansion
2501 East Telawa Trail
Phoenix, AZ
602-955-4079
www.wrigleymansionclub.com

Ninety-three degrees and no humidity. Great for swimming and suntanning.

Last week, we were in Phoenix. We are treated with a visit to Phoenix, now and then, to visit our children. The weather was gorgeous, everyday. We swam. Our grandkids prompted and pushed us on the water slide. Unexpected fun.

Early evening sunset in Arizona.

Evenings with family.

From New England to the Southwest. Would you go in the winter, spring, summer or fall? What’s your guess? If you had a choice, would you choose the southwest or the southeast?

Wrigley Mansion info from About.com.

Are You A Steampunker?

Are You A Steampunker?

Mighty news is in the works – Victoriana is back. I never thought I would see the day. From all I remember as a youngster, to my concentrated academia and career in the arts and disciplines teaching about beauty, I believed Victoriana had produced some of the ugliest products ever made in history. Like living in “Dark Shadows.” My years of work and study in art, design, and architecture have produced in me a clear idea of how space, color, and unity can be utilized to produce a well-designed and functional environment. Environments like schools, sports stadiums, spas, places of worship, galleries, museums, our homes and more. The list is long.

According to Wikipedia: Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction, fantasy, alternate history, and speculative fiction that came into prominence during the 1980s and early 1990s. Steampunk involves a setting where steam power was widely used—usually the Victorian era Britain—that incorporates elements of either science fiction or fantasy. Works of Steampunk often feature anachronistic technology or futuristic innovations as Victorians may have envisioned them; based on a Victorian perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, art, etc. This technology may include such fictional machines as those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne.

Image below on the left is a handsome 21st Century clock by Roger Wood made in the aesthetics of Steampunk style. Metal and layers. See more on his website. http://www.klockwerks.com

Steampunk garnered its name from the idea of steam power and the inventions of the industrial revolution. It is based on history. Robert Fulton and his steam engine were instrumental in changing manufacturing. Eli Whitney and his cotton gin made extracting cotton from the plant easier. The spinning jenny run by steam made weaving easier. The Industrial Revolution marked a major turning point in human history.

Image on right is the only surviving example of a Spinning mule built by the inventor Samuel Crompton.

Almost every aspect of daily life was influenced in some way. Machine-based manufacturing became protocol. Victoriana produced thinkers of future possibilities and science fiction, hence Steampunk; layering, metal, designing with objects of technology.

Image on right, Victoriana style, is a Herter sofa made for the Lockwood’s, circa 1867. Two of the sofas can be seen in Lockwood Mathews Mansion Museum in Norwalk CT. The mansion is still looking for the other pair. Lockwood is open to the public. www.lockwoodmathewsmansion.com 

Remember a couple of years ago in fashion when layering became popular? Now it’s more popular than ever. We discovered layering works, both indoors and outdoors, and it is fashionable. For fashion, so many designs are being shown in layered form.

Free People fashions for Bloomingdale's

2011 Free People on the left in particular.

 

Image above on right: 1905 Duster keeps the road dust from the new automobiles off her layers of underclothing.

Mrs. Lockwood layered in corset, petticoats, slips, blouse and can you see more?

Image on left: Let’s look at Mrs. Lockwood in the 19th Century in the Rotunda of her home,  Lockwood Mathews Mansion Museum. Layers once again.  Can you figure out how many layers she is wearing?

Come back next week for another look at Steampunk and Victoriana. How are those layers being translated? Are we heading for another Victoriana or will we stop before it goes overboard? It may be too late!

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