DESIGNER FABRICS YOU CAN’T BUY-UNTIL . . .

DESIGNER FABRICS YOU CAN’T BUY-UNTIL . . .

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House is considered one of the foremost style-setters in the decorative fabric industry and is the first choice of many of the world’s top interior designers. Many of their fabrics retail for well over $400 dollars per yard.

Headquartered in New York City’s famed D&D Building, Clarence House has been at the forefront of the decorative fabric industry for over 40 years. They were founded in 1961 by New York designer Robin Roberts, who envisioned a company that would fill a void in the decorative fabric industry, a void that was created by the vast majority fabric companies refusing to take the necessary design risks to move the home decor business forward. Since the very beginning, Roberts has filled Clarence House’s line of decorative fabrics with imported fabrics never before seen in America. It wasn’t long after that that Clarence House decided to get involved in all aspects of the creative process by starting their own in-house design studio and making the now famous Kazumi Yoshida their head art director. To this day Kazumi still controls the evolution of each design from its conception to the finished product.

Clarence House Fabric

Clarence House Fabric

Not long after becoming involved in the decorative fabric industry they were quickly becoming world renowned for their extremely unusual and opulent designs. Although they are most famous for their hand screen-printing of fabrics and wallpapers, Clarence House also offers the highest quality velvets, brocades, damasks, silks, cottons, linens, sheers, trimmings and leathers. Throughout their years in the decorative fabric business they have supplied the fabrics for some of the world’s most famous museums, residences, and historic sites. Their name appears in every issue of any important interior design magazine available– including Architectural Digest, Florida Design, and Veranda.

Ideas for left over fabric

Ideas for left over fabric

With 16 showrooms throughout the United States and additional showrooms in South Africa, Canada, and Australia—Clarence House is on a well-earned course to achieve world-wide design dominance.

Unfortunately, unless you are an Architect or an Interior Designer you cannot buy directly from them.

That is, of course, only true if you don’t know the Design Diva. Having known the people at Clarence House for over 15 years she is able to purchase large amounts of exclusive decorative fabrics from them and bring them to you at extremely discounted prices.

Now isn’t that Divalicious?

Close up for use of leftover fabric-fun

Close up for use of leftover fabric-fun

Designer Fabrics Below Wholesale

The people who run Design Diva Fabrics have been involved in many of the design communities most prestigious organizations for over 30 years. OUR LOVE of interior fabrics fuels us in our worldwide search for the most unusual fabrics and trims available. From the luscious Velvets of Belgium and the magnificent Brocades of Italy to the intricately Hand Embroidered Silks of the Far East, we have it all. And as if that was’nt enough, almost all of our fabrics are normally available exclusively to designers and architects.

Now you would think that the fact that we are able to acquire these fabrics at all would be impressive enough to be our claim to fame, but it’s not. Not only do we get our customers fabrics that are normally not available to them; we get our customers these fabrics for a fraction of the price that a licensed Interior Designer would pay for them.

Have you ever shopped at the D&D Building 979 Third Avenue, NYC?

 

COSTUMES OF THE PAST

COSTUMES OF THE PAST

Riding habit 1864

Riding habit 1864

child on belter sofaIf you are a writer, you research. Once you get on the road to discovery, there is no end. Sometimes though, your research doesn’t always point in the right direction. It’s sort of like looking in the dictionary for a word you can’t spell, but have to know how to spell in order to find the one you are looking for. For fashions of the past, you must know something about the era you are researching. You need a date, culture, fabrics, patterns, decorative arts, architecture and more. Your descriptions give authenticity and place to your story.

The discovery of photography around 1839 amazed folks, you could see on paper people you know looking like themselves and not moving. Before that, painted portraits were the only choice that only the wealthy could afford. 320px-painted by Winterhalter_ElisabethDaguerreotype, ambrotypes, cartes de visite, tintypes and cabinet cards (all types of photographs) galleries popped up in the big cities like Boston, New York and Philadelphia. In a short time every city had at least one gallery. Picture taking grew so fast, before long rural areas had galleries. Now it was possible to pass on family photos for all classes. Women’s fashions of the Victorian era both pleasures and horrifies us. Painfully corseted wasp waists, dirt-collecting trains, billowing hoop skirts, absurd and cumbersome bustles—outrageous hats-one sartorial excess succeeded another.

Women’s fashion of the 1860s, basic silhouette fit closely through the bodice to the waist, then the skirt widens into a full round or dome-shape. Armhole seams are placed below the natural shoulder on the upper part of the arm. Fairly crisp fabrics with enough body to enhance the fullness of the skirt, even though it is supported by a hoop.

Bustle dress 1870s

Bustle dress c1870

Among the silks for better dresses, taffeta, plaid and striped patterns, and iridescent fabrics were popular. Day dresses were washable cotton or linen.

The bustle became more fashionable in the 1870s, but outfits for sports were devised by homemakers. Women had ridden horses for recreation as well as for transportation for a number of centuries. Women now participated in active sports, tennis, golf, roller skating, hiking, and even mountain climbing. Fashions changed to fit life styles.

1850gown1

boyon swing1880x flowered day dress grandpa&girl1880s man at staircase 1880s man1890s men4 1880s red-printed-tudor-victorian-ball-gowns Tissot-hide-seek-detail Tissot_lilacs_1875 tumblr_m2gox1bDaz1rskfzmo1_500  Melville_-_Queen_Victoria Victorian-Dress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victorian-Dress-Patterns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This era was the last of the cumbersome costumes and breathe defying corsets.

Public Domain images: 1850s to 1880s.
Dover Publications

Where do writers go to get their material? Do writers write from their imagination, or must they research everything? Writers, what’s your take on these questions?

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