ELECTROLYSIS

ELECTROLYSIS

Beauty Therapist

Beauty Therapist

It’s good for women and good for men too. Be happy with beautiful hair-free skin, the skin you’ve always dreamed of. I so believe this is the way to rid yourself of unwanted face and body hair, I decided to write about it today. It’s all about electrolysis, permanent hair removal. With electrolysis, little-by-little the hair follicles disappear. I have been visiting an electrologist for as long as hair appeared on my face, hair that would be better on my hubby’s face, not mine. My visits after treatment dwindled in frequency, now I go only yearly, or if I see one hair, I do not tweeze, I usually visit my electrologist.

Rita Hayworth before-after-hairline-electrolysis

Rita Hayworth before-after-hairline-electrolysis

I know there are other methods of hair removal, but I know that none, I mean none, are permanent. Only electrolysis is permanent. Recently, after being with my electrologist for the last fifteen years, she, Fatima, decided to go back to school. I had to find someone new. Today’s recommendation came from my hair salon, Karen Kolenda, State Licensed Electrologist, who’s office is at the Brick Walk in Fairfield, CT. Karen has good hands. We talked before the treatment when she asked if I ever had electrolysis, and yes, I had. I knew what to expect, and was pleased that it was exactly as I expected. Her office is clean and, although small, is well layed out and comfortable.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
electrolysis slide_7Charles Michel was an American ophthalmologist best known for publishing the first clinical report of successful electrology in 1875. Michel was practicing in St. Louis, Missouri, when he began using a battery-powered needle epilator to treat trichiasis (ingrown eyelashes) in 1869. This direct current–powered method was called electrolysis because a chemical reaction in the hair follicle causes sodium hydroxide to form, which damages the follicle. Electrolysis is also sometimes called galvanic electrolysis.
 Do not fear the use of the fine probe that gives off a small amount of electrical current to destroy the hair root permanently without puncturing or harming the skin. The current is adjustable for your comfort, and feels like a pin prick. Some areas are more sensitive than others, but as I mentioned, the current is adjustable and can be lessened.
One of my friends, a young woman, began shaving her facial hair, and now, she has to shave everyday. All methods, except electrolysis, causes the hair to thicken and grow deeper. Facial hair does seem to begin to be prevalent when a woman’s hormones begin to change, usually in the late forties or early fifties.
For more answers to your questions, you can call Karen or visit her. It is not expensive to do this. I usually only need 15 minutes, that cost me today $28 cash or check. So worth every penny. Less than a manicure.
Karen Kolenda Gregory, Suite !-5 Downstairs at the Brick Walk, 1275 Post Road, Fairfield, CT 06824, 203-254-2480.
WHITE – A PRACTICAL SOLUTION?

WHITE – A PRACTICAL SOLUTION?

Ingres’ Bather of Valpinςon

White can be blinding. White can disrupt your thinking. White can be tiresome. According to Faber Birren’s book “Color & Human Response,” white can be bleak, emotionless, sterile. K. Warner Schaie, in discussing the pyramid test in which wide assortments of colors are placed on black-and-white charts, noted that incidence of the use of white by schizophrenic patients was 76.6 percent as again 29.1 percent for supposedly normal persons. So anyone who places white first perhaps needs psychiatric attention. It would be better to dislike white, but here again few persons are encountered who so express themselves.

Ingres’ Bather of Valpinςon is the calm representation of Classical beauty in the human nude. Notice the varying shades of white in Ingres’ painting. White and light colored skin is, depending on the artist, a few chosen pigments  and white. Notice the white covering over the settee, there are other colors in it. Can you see them? There are hundreds of variations of white.

Then when is white a practical solution?

Untitled by Franz Kline, a canvas  covered in white variations

White for the artist. For the watercolor artist, white paint is not necessary. I have never used white in my watercolors, because you can lighten your colors with water. And, you can leave the white of the paper in your painting for the white areas.  For the oil or acrylic painter, mix the white into color to lighten, or for pastel, add color to white.

Sounds pretty easy, doesn’t it?  It isn’t hard, but you need more information if you use white in more than one color. White can make mud out of your paint. Pastel painters have scads and scads and scads of color sticks as do oil painters who have gazillion tubes of paint from the lightest to the darkest in almost every color. So why do you need white? It’s possible to use white in your mixes, especially if you add white to lighten only one color. If you add white to more than one color, it can muddy up your work, the same as cadmium yellow can. We talked about cad yellow in last week’s blog with David Dunlop. More mixing meant less light bounced back to the eye and resulted in a weak color effect. Mixing opaque colors together is called subtractive mixing because it subtracts light. http://gailingis.com/wordpress/?p=2252.

Your intent was to lighten, but instead, it deadened. Deadened with

Sculpture in glass by Tony Cragg, All white sculpture, mixture of textures

opaque pigment. But it takes time to learn what makes beautiful mud. Yes, there is such a thing as beautiful mud. You always want your colors to be rich, to glow, to evoke emotion. To confuse the issue, white comes in several variations, some of which are: Flake White, Ivory White, Zinc White, Titanium White and the combo of Zinc White and Titanium White. The properties of these paints vary.

According to Ralph Mayer’s The Artist’s Handbook of Materials and Techniques, Fifth Edition, Revised and Updated, titanium pigment has the greatest opacity and tinctorial power of any of the whites. Titanium is the most important opaque white pigment in current use. An extremely dense, powerful opaque white of high refractive index and great hiding power. Absolutely inert, permanent.  Flake White is stiff, and Ivory White is fluid, both are semi-opaque and good for touching-up and mixing. According to Winsor & Newton, Zinc is less opaque, making it ideal for tints and glazing, however, it dries to a brittle film that can crack.

White room, varied whites and mixture of textures

White for your home/office. The everlasting question to me as an interior designer is, “should I paint my kitchen white?” My answer is always, “NO.” Not pure white. If your preference is to make it look bright and clean and you think white is the answer, here’s mine. Paint your walls off-white, like Benjamin Moore’s 966 or 969 (I call them greige, 969 is the lighter of the two), or something with a little more pizzazz, like BM’s 860 that is in-between white and gray. The finish on the walls should be Eggshell finish. Ceiling, super white flat. All the trim can be a bright semi-gloss white. Now the room has that sparkle you are looking for and stays clean for years. And, you can have your white cabinets, but in Benjamin Moore’s Dove White. Never use pure white on a large expanse of space like the walls, cabinets, or floors. With these combinations, you have contrasting surfaces and varying textures giving your kitchen interest as well as beauty.

Can you see the correlation between white for art and white for the home? Did you discover the white you never knew? What does white mean to you?

 

 

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