Rough journeys

Rough journeys

Pestilence and death accompanied the emigrants from across the seas. The 114 colonists who established Savannah on February 12, 1733, were transported to America aboard the Good Ship Anne. Captain John Thomas, who was in command, had the responsibility of getting these people to the new land of opportunity. They left Gravesend on the Thames on November 16, 1732. Danger surrounded them when their water turned foul and black, the beer soured, the daily ration was cut to about two cups a day, and molasses was used to sweeten what water remained. Two children died, chickens and animals died. Dr. William Cox, almost killed those still alive with the practice of blood letting. The people got preached to by the bastard son of the Earl of Torrington, Reverend Dr. Henry Herbert. Well, guess that wasn’t his fault, born a bastard, but in those days, people knew who the bastards were, and frowned down upon them. This didn’t sound like the trip of your dreams.

colonists

colonists

But all was not bad. Story says that one night flying fish landed on board. Strange birds were sighted, one was caught and eaten. James Edward Oglethorpe under a parasol, (hmm, that’s an umbrella) went fishing in the ship’s long boat. I wonder who held the umbrella? A dolphin was caught and given to the pregnant women.  No one else ate, not Oglethorpe either, but to celebrate his birthday on December 21, Oglethorpe dispensed mutton, (guess he killed a lamb) broth and bumbo* to the merry passengers (actually they weren’t merry until after the bumbo). Toasts were made to the health of the success of the colony of Georgia. They seem to have plenty of alcoholic, imbibing liquids. Good thing, they should have used those liquids for cleansing, instead of blood letting . . .

ship 1703

ship 1703

By January 13, 1733, the Anne arrived off the bar of Charleston, South Carolina. Oglethorpe went ashore and obtained the king’s pilot, Mr. Middleton, to guide the ship southward to Port Royal. After a short stay in newly erected barracks, the colonists were brought up the Savannah River aboard six small boats and landed at Yamacraw Bluff on February 12, 1733, the anniversary that has been celebrated ever since as Georgia day.

This is an excerpt by John Duncan, Professor Emeritus, at Armstrong Atlantic State University, that I found on a paper placemat at the Boars Head Grill  & Tavern on the wharf in Savannah.

*Bumbo–cold punch, rum, sugar, water & nutmeg. This–is a good recipe!

sailed into port

sailed into port

Do you have any relatives that fit the Good  Ship Anne?

 

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