THE BRIDE AND THE BIKE

THE BRIDE AND THE BIKE

She was disembarking, but her gown was cumbersome. Charleston, South Carolina seems to have a most unique way to get a bride to the church. Somewhat less than elegant, the bride remained unruffled and finally got to walk into the place she would be joined with her man. Or perhaps she brought her man with her? Disconnected from the man she disembarked with, swed P1090806wed P1090800wed P1090801wed P1090802wed P1090803he does seem rather in a hurry to get into the church.wed P1090805

Quite unique. Don’t you think?

 

LIFE ON THE PLAINS

LIFE ON THE PLAINS

Painting by Earl Bodner, circa 1833

Painting by Earl Bodner, circa 1833

Life in a tipi offers a different kind of experience than life in the typical wood structure.  American Sioux built the tipi for daily living. Painted tipis had important kinds of pictographic writing. Based on Native American Architecture by Peter Nabokov and Robert Eastman, paintings on Plains Indian tipis depicted exploits of the head male occupant, or supernatural creatures associated with sacred powers he or his direct ancestors had received during visions.

Tipi Oglala with Lakota girl by front door 1891

Tipi Oglala with Lakota girl by front door 1891

A tipi is a conical tent and is constructed with wood poles, stakes, pins and covers of animal skins, although modern covers are usually made of canvas. To build a tipi, a straight and strong, long lodge pole of pine or red cedar was made into a three-or four pole frame and lifted into place. The tipi is durable, provides warmth and comfort in winter, is cool in summer, and stays dry during heavy rains. The detachable cover over the structure were buffalo skins or cloth lining and a door of canvas or bison calfskin. There may also be a partial interior ceiling that covers sleepers and protects the inhabitant from rain.

Tipi interior

Tipi interior

Rope or raw hide, and wooden pegs are required to bind the poles, close the cover, attach the lining and door, and anchor the resulting structure to the ground. Tipis are distinguished from other tents by two crucial innovations, the opening at the top and the smoke flaps, which allow the inhabitant to cook and heat themselves with an open fire. The flaps are lined for use in the winter, and can be opened for ventilation and to create a down draft for the fire.

Tipi covers are made by sewing together strips of canvas or tanned bison hide (historically) and has a semicircular shape. Trimming this shape yields a door and the smoke flaps that allow the dwellers to control the chimney effect to expel smoke from their fires. Old style traditional linings were hides, blankets, and rectangular pieces of cloth hanging about four to five feet above the ground tied to the poles or a rope. Today’s modern lining is the most difficult element to measure, since it consists of trapezoid-shaped strips of canvas assembled to form the shape of a truncated cone. The poles, made of peeled, polished and dried tapering saplings (historically pine) cut to measure about six feet more than the radius of the cover.

If you have an interest to build a tipi for camping, or you are just plain curious . . . Read more here:

What do you think? Are you surprised that it takes some ingenuity to build a tipi to inhabit?

SNOB HILL

SNOB HILL

Mark Hopkins mansion top of Nob Hill

Mark Hopkins mansion top of Nob Hill

Nob Hill, also known as Snob Hill, is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, centered on the intersection of California Street and Powell Street. It is one of San Francisco’s 44 hills, and one of its original “Seven Hills.” Prior to the 1850s, Nob Hill was called California Hill (after California Street, which climbs its steep eastern face). It was renamed after the Central Pacific Railroad’s Big Four — called the Nobs — built mansions there. The British slang nob is a disparaging term for newly rich, derived from the Mughal India/Bengali word nawab that refers to an upper-class individual.

Mark Hopkins (September 1, 1813-March 29, 1878), an entrepreneur, was one of four principal investors who formed the Central Pacific Railroad along with Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker, and Collis Huntington in 1861.  Hopkins built an ornate mansion at the top of Nob Hill in San Francisco, California, close to the mansions of other Central Pacific Founders. The architects were the prominent San Francisco firm of Wright and Sanders. Hopkins was never going to see his mansion completed. He was having health problems, and died aboard a company train near Yuma, Arizona. The mansion, eventually finished and occupied by his wife Mary, burned to the ground in a fire caused by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The neighborhood was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire, except for the granite walls surrounding the Stanford, Crocker, Huntington and Hopkins mansions. Those walls remain and you can see black scars caused by smoke from the intense fires that burned after the quake.

Mark Hopkins Hotel, built in 1926, renovated 2009

Mark Hopkins Hotel, built in 1926, renovated 2009

The Mark Hopkins Hotel (currently InterContinental Mark Hopkins San Francisco) was built in its place in 1926.

In one of my lifetimes, I was privileged to be a guest at this magnificent, now four star, hotel and dine at the top of the mark. Walking down the hill and up were both challenging. Nob Hill, San Francisco (Looking west up California Street, Nob Hill district, San Francisco) - Photo by Dave Glass (flickr.com/daveglass), February 14, 2009San_Francisco_Street_on_Nob_Hill wild-parrots-of-telegraph-hill biker-steep-san-francisco-hill

Cable cars are the way up to Nob Hill and down to Union Square.

Is San Francisco a favorite city? Have you been to Scoma’s on Fisherman’s Wharf? Have you seen Seal rock?

The wild parrots in the image here are perched on branches on Telegraph Hill.

How would you like to bike there?

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