PAPER ARCHITECTURE

PAPER ARCHITECTURE

Architecture generally involves creating monuments to permanence from . . .  transient materials like paper tubes and plastic beer crates.

House of Cards Japanese Pavilion 2000

‘House of Cards’ Japanese Pavilion Expo 2000

The Japanese Pavilion for Expo 2000, held in Hannover, Germany, was a grid structure made ​​of recyclable paper tubes resulting in a building with honeycomb. Ban created the pavilion building in collaboration with the architect Frei Otto and structural engineer Buro Happold. The 72-meter-long gridshell structure was made with paper tubes. But due to stringent building laws in Germany, the roof had to be reinforced with a substructure. After the exhibition the structure was recycled and returned to paper pulp. Shigeru Ban, born in Tokyo, Japan, is an international architect, most famous for his innovative work with paper. His use of  recycled cardboard tubes affords prompt and efficient housing to disaster victims. In the aftermath of the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, Japan, Ban built temporary homes for Vietnamese refugees using beer crates filled with sandbags. In the mid-1990s, he was the first architect in Japan to construct a building primarily out of paper  and required special approval to pass Japan’s strict building codes. Ban has a romance with paper because of its low cost, recyclability, low-technology and replaceability. Another aspect of Ban’s influence is his humanitarianism and his attraction to ecological architecture. Ban’s work with paper and other materials is heavily based on its sustainability and its lack of waste.  As a result, Ban’s DIY refugee shelters (used in Japan after the Kobe earthquake, in Turkey, Rwanda and around the world) are very popular and effective for low-cost disaster relief-housing, as seen in the cardboard container housing in the image below.

Japanese housing complex

Japanese housing complex

Ban is referred to as an ecological architect, a modernist, an experimentalist and rationalist. Ban himself quotes, “I don’t like waste,” summing up his philosophy. He was profiled by Time magazine in their projection of 21st century innovators in the field of architecture and design. In 2014, Ban was named the 37th recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, the most prestigious prize in modernist architecture. The Pritzker Jury cited Ban for his innovative use of material and his dedication to humanitarian efforts around the world. If you are wondering about the use of paper in building–no worries–the paper tubes used for support in Ban’s buildings are protected from the elements  by a roof above and concrete floors below. Perhaps you would like to make your own paper architecture?

The Paper Architect: Fold-It-Yourself Buildings and Structures Hardcover-spiral, by Marivi Garrido (Author), Ingrid Siliakus (Author) can be found at Amazon. Here’s the Amazon link:

BARN CONVERSIONS

BARN CONVERSIONS

Raise your hand if you live in a converted barn. Not a new house that’s made to look like a barn, but an old nineteenth or early twentieth century converted barn. The old post and beam construction. I have some images for you to peruse.barn destruct to paint barn home1images barn house 2 barn house interiot 1 barn house rear1 barn house Thin-joint-construction-between-portals1 barnhouse 4The first one is my favorite. It is called deconstruction. Don’t be surprised if you see it in one of my paintings. LOL, really. The one that looks like it is under construction is being turned into a boutique office barnhouse 3&silobuilding.

There are some designs and workmanship that defy time. Some were built in the 1850s. They make intriguing transitions to the 20th century. These barnhomes are located in different areas across the country, and as you can see, can be quite handsome. Each one creates an entirely unique home and are usually the focus on the land that was farmland years ago. The images on the left are of a 2,450-square-foot home with 2 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. The image below still has its silo. Imagine a wrought iron circular staircase in the silo, like one in Sherlock Holmes detective stories. That staircase twisted at every turn, and took you into spooky, dark places, like old dusty libraries.

Do you have any friends that live in a converted barn? What do you think they smell like? Animals, timber, cedar, what?

THE BARN

THE BARN

Montana barn

Montana barn

Barns are simple structures of basic post and beam construction. I love barns, I love barn shapes, and barn roofs.  I love to paint barns . . . on canvas that is. Barns not only keep animals, but are large enough to invite friends, family and all your neighbors and have a barn dance, a wedding, or become a quirky,  marvelous architectural space. Some folks live in barns.

Barns are sometimes a large shed used for storing vehicles. It’s been said that a barn is a large and unattractive building. Buildings are sometimes referred to as a barn of a house. Is a barn the same as a stable? Wasn’t Jesus born in a barn, or was it a stable? Do you think they are the same? Barns are also known as a large building for storing grain, hay or straw and housing livestock. And tools, lots of tools. barn inside w. tools barn montana elevator barn smiles barn traditional  barn w. clothes barn w. roof shapes barn w.horse wind gauge barn w.horse barn w.red tree 747cdae123ad7d1447282a0d4fa3fe77 barn w.storm barns and cowsSquare dances are fun in a barn. Which barn would you like to see me paint? Do you like barn paintings? Do you have a barn you love? Here’s more for your viewing pleasure. Which one is your favorite?mtnplay_dancers2

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