FLYER INVITATION STEAMPUNK: NATURE & MACHINE

FLYER INVITATION STEAMPUNK: NATURE & MACHINE

FLYER: Lockwood Mathews Mansion Museum April 25th Exhibition

FLYER: Lockwood Mathews Mansion Museum April 25th Exhibition

YOUR INVITATION . . . April 25, 2013, 6-8 p.m.

Today’s news AND Invitation comes in the form of a flyer about an innovative exhibition. The exhibition is about the Nineteenth Century Industrial Revolution in the Twenty-First Century, happening at Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Click the flyer for legibility. It will be big enough to read the details.

RSVP: 203-838-9799 ext. 4.

Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction that typically features steam-powered machinery in the 19th century Victorian era. Fictional machines of technology were found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne.  Steampunk may also, though not necessarily, incorporate additional elements from the genres of fantasy, horror, historical fiction, alternate history, or other branches of speculative fiction, making it often a hybrid genre. The term steampunk’s first known appearance was in 1987, though it now retroactively refers to many works of fiction created

Steampunk couture

Steampunk couture

even as far back as the 1950s or 1960s.

Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum
295 West Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06850.

The reception is free, but we need your RSVP 203-838-9799 ext. 4.

Coming? We would love to share the evening’s hullabaloo.

 

 

TENNIS FOR THE HOPEFUL

TENNIS FOR THE HOPEFUL

Roger Federer at Indian Wells 2013

Roger Federer at Indian Wells 2013

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer

What? I lost again. I have the best coach, I serve hundreds of balls, hit with my partner, practice my strategy. How come I lost again?

Sound familiar?

I am talking about tennis. But it could be any sport. Or anything? What keeps any of us from walking away with the trophy? Could it be a head trip? What are you thinking when you hit that ball? The difference between a good player and a great player has to be mental. It makes sense. You beat all the club players, but when you play in those tournaments, it all goes downhill.

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal

And the higher you reach, the more you need mental stamina. You might have a tough exterior, but what about your interior? Your inner workings need toughness. Even if you are a Roger Federer, or a Rafael Nadal., or a Tiger Woods. How do they stay at the top? Physically … mentally.  You need confidence, persistence, tenacity and most of all, focus.

I met Jane, a terrific tennis player, in interior design school so many years ago that I’m not saying. We traveled NYC together, studied together, built projects together. And in the summer, we hit the ball. I had just started playing and loved it. Jane asked if I’d like to learn. She had just passed a rigorous exam by the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA). I gawked at her, my jaw

Roger Federed

Roger Federer

dropped, and asked, “You teach tennis?”

Long story short, I practiced, practiced and practiced. Then I took that same USPTA exam and passed. Became pretty proficient, but I never could beat Jane. Even though she said, “What’s the matter with you? You’re now a better player than me.” She was my teacher, my coach, my playing partner, I couldn’t do it, I couldn’t beat her. I never did. Head trip. And … I taught tennis for years before I was consumed by my career in interior design.

There are mental training specialists, not psychologists or psychiatrists. In my tennis organization there are those for just this purpose.  Mental training is a critical part of success.

Take a look: Damien LaFont, PhD, Certified Mental Trainer www.mentaltraininginc.com.

Juan Martin del Potro

Juan Martin del Potro

Anyone following Juan Martín del Potro? He did great this tournament. He climbed almost to the top at Indian Wells, lost in the finals to Nadal, a tough competitor.

How many of you know that Doubt Monster?  Do you believe you have more tenacity than it? Can you turn your passion into progress?

 

WIZARD OF OOZE

WIZARD OF OOZE

Scrolling through what I thought was a remake of L. Frank Baum’s movie, Wizard of Oz, this cartoon of William Randolph Hearst popped up. Stories say that the movie had political connotations. Read on–this from Wikipedia.

Wizard of Ooz from Harper's Weekly 1906

Cartoonist W. A. Rogers in 1906 sees the political uses of Oz: he depicts William Randolph Hearst as Scarecrow stuck in his own Ooze in Harper’s Weekly in the photo on the right.

Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz include treatments of the modern fairy tale (written by L. Frank Baum and first published in 1900) as an allegory or metaphor for the political, economic and social events of America in the 1890s. Scholars have examined four quite different versions of Oz: the novel of 1900,[1] the Broadway Play of 1901,[2] the Hollywood film of 1939,[3] and the numerous follow-up Oz novels written after 1900 by Baum and others.[4]wizard-of-oz-original

The political interpretations focus on the first three, and emphasize the close relationship between the visual images and the story line to the political interests of the day. Biographers report that Baum had been a political activist in the 1890s with a special interest in the money question of gold and silver, and the illustrator Denslow was a full-time editorial cartoonist for a major daily newspaper. For the 1901 Broadway production Baum inserted explicit references to prominent political characters such as President Theodore Roosevelt.

In a 1964 article,[5] educator and historian Henry Littlefield outlined an allegory in the book of the late 19th-century debate regarding monetary policy. According to this view, for instance, the “Yellow Brick Road” represents the gold standard, and the silver slippers (ruby in the 1939 film version) represent the Silverite sixteen to one silver ratio (dancing down the road).

The thesis achieved considerable popular interest and elaboration by many scholars in history, economics and other fields,[6] but is not universally accepted.[7][8][9] Certainly the 1901 musical version of “Oz”, written by Baum, was for an adult audience and had numerous explicit references to contemporary politics,[2] though in these references Baum seems just to have been “playing for laughs.”[10] The 1902 stage adaptation mentioned, by name, President Theodore Roosevelt and other political celebrities.[11] For example, the Tin Woodman wonders what he would do if he ran out of oil. “You wouldn’t be as badly off as John D. Rockefeller,” the Scarecrow responds, “He’d lose six thousand dollars a minute if that happened.”[2]

Littlefield’s knowledge of the 1890s was thin, and he made numerous errors, but since his article was published, scholars in history,[7] political science[1] and economics[12] have asserted that the images and characters used by Baum closely resemble political images that were well known in the 1890s. Quentin Taylor, for example, claimed that many of the events and characters of the book resemble the actual political personalities, events and ideas of the 1890s.[11] Dorothy—naïve, young and simple—represents the American people. She is Everyman, led astray and seeking the way back home.[11] Moreover, following the road of gold leads eventually only to the Emerald City, which may symbolize the fraudulent world of greenback paper money that only pretends to have value.[11] It is ruled by a scheming politician (the Wizard) who uses publicity devices and tricks to fool the people (and even the Good Witches) into believing he is benevolent, wise and powerful when really he is selfish and cruel. He sends Dorothy into severe danger hoping she will rid him of his enemy the Wicked Witch of the West.

meet the wicked witch from the Wizard of Oz

Meet the wicked witch from the Wizard of Oz

He is powerless and, as he admits to Dorothy, “I’m a very bad Wizard.”[13]

Littlefield and other historians[14] have suggested that Baum modeled the Cowardly Lion after politician William Jennings Bryan, or politicians in general. Republicans mocked Bryan as indecisive, or a coward, which became the basis of the character.[15]

Historian Quentin Taylor sees additional metaphors, including:

 

  • The Scarecrow as a representation of American farmers and their troubles in the late 19th century.
  • The Tin Man representing the American steel industry’s failures to combat increased international competition at the time
  • The Cowardly Lion as a metaphor for the American military’s performance in the Spanish-American War. For numerical references here’s the link:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_interpretations_of_The_Wonderful_Wizard_of_Oz
    Its fascinating to look at this suspense filled adventure for a little girl in another way. The Wizard of Oz became a venue for political awareness. Or did it? Did you think that the movie was a political commentary?

 

A LITTLE BIT OF EGYPT

A LITTLE BIT OF EGYPT

Egypt Karnak Temple at the banks Nile Karnak is an ancient Egyptian temple precinct located on the east bank of the Nile River in Thebes (modern-day Luxor). It covers more than 100 hectares, an area larger than some ancient cities.

Egypt’s history spans some five millenniums, and encompasses the origin of civilization, the rise of the Greeks and Romans, the establishment of the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions, the colonial era when first France and then the English ruled the country, and finally, a return to independence. Egypt has played an important role through all of these eras, and today one can find monuments that evidence Egypt’s role in most of the world’s historic events.

Painting by Jean Leon  Cleopatra and Caesar

“Cleopatra and Caesar”    by Jean Leon Gerome

In Egypt, we find the earliest detailed records of warfare recorded thousands of years ago, but we also find the cemeteries and monuments of the world’s last global war, World War II.  In Egypt, we find some of the first written words of civilization, but we also find great thinkers and writers throughout the Greek period, into the Christian era, the archaic Islamic period and even modern Nobel Literates.  We find ancient pyramids and giant columns supporting massive temples; now we can  find these architectural elements spread throughout the world.  Along with the first monumental buildings made of stone, we find the first paved roads, the first wines and beer and even the first peace treaties between organized governments. We also find the world’s first scientists, doctors, architects and mathematicians.

Art of belly dancing

Art of belly dancing

Egypt is our window to humanity’s distant past and in understanding its history, we find both mankind’s greatest glories and achievements, as well as his often-repeated mistakes.  We can follow along with the building of empires, only to see them collapse again and again.  We find great men and rulers renowned, but we often also see their ultimate demise.  And here, we learn about religion, its evolution and, as the world grows older, its replacement with newer religions.

Please, take the time to understand ancient Egyptian history for you will find, within this knowledge, a better understanding of this modern world in which we live.

This article is Gail Ingis’s writing from her text book and lectures: History of Architecture & Interior Design. (unpublished).

egypt camel&boy imagesHave you been to Egypt? Any favorite sites? Did you ride a camel . . .  in Egypt? Can you belly dance?

 

 

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